learn routing for fun and send me some funny topology diagram if you have

Posted: April 30, 2015 in CCNA
Tags: ,

This article is just for fun to CCNA Learning students or networking learner.But with fun you can learn how to configure static routing to such topology and how to decide how many networks are in this topology.Since i have been providing CCNA TRAINING from last 5 years i have seen that so many ccna learning students get confused when i insert switches between routers.They failed to decide correct number of network and what should be the ip address of interfaces of routers.Thats why i have decided to write articles on all such topology with configurations so that students get benefited from it.If any one of you have any topology like this which is complicated and which bothers you, you can send the topology diagram to me and i will answer your question with configuration here.

static routing configuration lab

Before Routing we need to decide network and then configure ip address on each router interface:

I have configured both routers step wise in just few simple steps.To learn the configuration just see below.

 

I am going to start with Router R1:

— System Configuration Dialog —

Continue with configuration dialog? [yes/no]: no

Press RETURN to get started!

Router>enable
Router#config t
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)#hostname R1
R1(config)#int eth0/0/0
R1(config-if)#ip address 2.0.0.1 255.0.0.0
R1(config-if)#no shut

R1(config-if)#exit
R1(config)#int fa0/0
R1(config-if)#ip address 3.0.0.1 255.0.0.0
R1(config-if)#no shut

R1(config-if)#exit
R1(config)#int fa0/1
R1(config-if)#ip address 4.0.0.1 255.0.0.0
R1(config-if)#no shut

 

Now start configuring Router R2:

— System Configuration Dialog —

Continue with configuration dialog? [yes/no]: no

Press RETURN to get started!

Router>enable
Router#config t
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)#hostname R2
R2(config)#int eth0/0/0
R2(config-if)#ip address 1.0.0.1 255.0.0.0
R2(config-if)#no shut

R2(config-if)#exit
R2(config)#int fa0/1
R2(config-if)#ip address 3.0.0.2 255.0.0.0
R2(config-if)#no shut

R2(config-if)#exit
R2(config)#int fa0/0
R2(config-if)#ip address 4.0.0.2 255.0.0.0
R2(config-if)#no shut

 

     Static Routing Configuration!

Static Routing Configuration on Router R1:

R1(config)#ip route 1.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 3.0.0.2
R1(config)#ip route 1.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 4.0.0.2

 

Static Routing configuration on Router R2:

R2(config)#ip route 2.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 3.0.0.1
R2(config)#ip route 2.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 4.0.0.1

 

 Troubleshooting/Testing Network Connectivity

R2>show ip route
Codes: C – connected, S – static, I – IGRP, R – RIP, M – mobile, B – BGP
D – EIGRP, EX – EIGRP external, O – OSPF, IA – OSPF inter area
N1 – OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 – OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 – OSPF external type 1, E2 – OSPF external type 2, E – EGP
i – IS-IS, L1 – IS-IS level-1, L2 – IS-IS level-2, ia – IS-IS inter area
* – candidate default, U – per-user static route, o – ODR
P – periodic downloaded static route

Gateway of last resort is not set

C 1.0.0.0/8 is directly connected, Ethernet0/0/0
S 2.0.0.0/8 [1/0] via 4.0.0.1
[1/0] via 3.0.0.1
C 3.0.0.0/8 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/1
C 4.0.0.0/8 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/0

 

R2>ping 4.0.0.1

Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 4.0.0.1, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 0/5/16 ms

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s